Poster 05: Effective Flash Continuous Glucose Monitoring for Patients Living with Type 1 Diabetes and Cognitive Impairment

Guy, MJ; Guillochon, R; Foglietta, C; Price, H
Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust; University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust
 

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) management can require high cognitive input.  and whilst digital diabetes technologies, such as Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM), have emerged over the last decade, it’s only valuable if you have access and are empowered to make use of the data produced.

Patients living with T1D and also cognitive decline are currently under-represented in terms of access to and exploration of effective use of CGM, and yet may have some of the greatest needs. Our aim was to use a Quality Improvement (QI) framework to establish current CGM usage in this patient population, including the perspective of carers, and those in nursing and residential care. We asked if it’s feasible to tailor the education provided to this patient cohort and their carers within the current care resources, and proposed validation of the impact of education and CGM roll-out changes.

Successful engagement with this patient cohort and their carers was achieved (100% initial uptake, 75% retained throughout), responding positively to being asked for their thoughts and opinions. We confirmed that CGM deployment, including in care home settings, is operationally successful and is also welcomed in this patient and carer cohort. Prototype, tailored education material and advice, covering both diabetes and memory impairment, was distributed and early positive feedback on our initial approaches to improve CGM efficacy received. Work is ongoing to further develop and validate these materials.

The initial stages of this project were funded through Q Exchange by the Health Foundation and NHS England / Improvement.

Discipline: 
Diabetes
Clinical taxonomy: 
Type 1 diabetes mellitus
Type 2 diabetes mellitus
Resource taxonomy: 
Event resources
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